Tag Archives: anarchist communism

Cut Military Spending? Scrap Trident?

john stewart

In 1998, the UN estimated that we would need $40 billion annually to sustain the entire WORLD population. This translates to roughly $58 billion today and would cover housing, food, clothing, health care, education, and a lot lot more. Any one of the countries listed in the picture above could provide that money if that where all it took.

You might be thinking that all that is needed is for a party to get in that will get into power that can reform the system and divert some of the money to meeting our needs, but capitalism cannot be reformed.

The closer a group gets to controlling power, or at least as groups get absorbed into the decision making structure, the divisions between rich and poor disappear from view and the status quo becomes less and less flawed. Preserving the current order (with the odd cosmetic difference here and there) becomes the goal.

As elections draw near there will be more and more calls to scrap trident, with the vulture political parties circling around our anger and horror about nuclear war and hoping to pick it apart for votes. No matter if we vote or not, or if the candidate agrees with us or not, the demand to scrap trident, by itself, is doomed to failure.

Many supporters of the SNP, the Greens, and the smaller socialist parties all think that the lip service for scrapping trident that their parties give now will translate into action if only we all get behind them and vote them into power, but lets look at what has already happened to see what will come down the line.

As the SNP have gotten closer to power they have had to change their posture so that they look appropriate for that power. This has manifested in their U-turn on leaving NATO, instead guaranteeing that an independent Scotland with them at the helm would remain a member.

The Trident missiles themselves (if not the warheads on them) are an american weapons system housed at Faslane under lease to the Royal Navy through a NATO treaty. It is impossible to scrap it without leaving NATO and the pissing off the US government.

The only reason the Greens and smaller parties can get away with still saying they would leave NATO is because they are not getting any closer to power at this time. They can remain a minority voice that will ultimately be ignored by whoever has power.

So let’s keep in mind that the cry to scrap trident is falling on deaf ears and by itself leads to a dead end of supporting political parties and electoral politics. Instead, as we shout out for trident to be scrapped, let’s also start shouting out for what we really need – a world without wars and a life where our well-being is met because we are alive – and let’s do it through building working class power with those who are around us.

After all, why back one party when we can build so that any of them would have to give us what we want least we take it for ourselves? And if we can take it for ourselves, well, that’s where real freedom lies!

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Angry Women Win!

The latest issue of our Resistance free sheet is on the streets! This special issue looks at the struggles of women, both historically and today. Articles include a look at:

  • Abortion struggles in Ireland and Spain
  • Legal battles for women in the UK
  • Gender and Factory Resistance in China
  • Women & LGBTQIA in Ukraine today
  • Free Women of Spain in the 1930s
  • Dealing with sexual harassment at work
  • Transgender struggles being side-tracked by mainstream acceptance
  • The Angry Women of Liverpool
  • Single mothers fighting social cleansing in East London

You can download the issue here!

A look back at AFem2014

Sunday the 19th of October seen the first International Anarcha-Feminist Conference, aka AFem2014. The seed from which it would eventually grow fell from the tree back in August of 2012. That tree was the St Imier International Congress anarcha-feminist round table. This was series of meetings that took  place on each of the five days of that event. In the closing session it’s participants announced their plans to host an anarcha-feminist congress of their own within several years. This was met by thunderous applause from the congress floor. Busily contacts were exchanged, interested parties came forward, and a group agreed to take lead on the project.

Then nothing.

Months passed.

The Anarchist Federation started to get occasional contacts asking if we knew of any organising on the Anarcha-Feminist Congress. Our international secretaries put out inquiries thought our sibling federations in IFA as well as any other contacts in the global anarchist movement. After some investigation it appeared that no planning had happened, and those who had stepped forward at St. Imier were out of contact. Sometimes things just can’t get done, such is the nature of being in a struggle, and definitely not something to be ashamed of.

That may have been the end of it if it wasn’t for one federation member deciding that this idea was necessary to both counter the failings of feminism outside the anarchist movement, with all other branches of thought happy to throw more and more people under the bus in the name of capitalism; and also within, as we see elements of the anarchist movement where misogyny and sexism are rife and where little more than lip service is given to overcoming the power structures surrounding gender, especially in regard to groups marginalized even by other feminists.

Discussions were had and soon proposals drafted for the fed to kickstart the previously proposed international event. The discussions were thorough and some of the goals laid out at this early stage. This wasn’t to be a project hosted only by the AF (as had previous anarcha-feminist events we had been involved in organising), or just undertaken by our international the IFA, but was to be born from the AF and gain its own autonomy. It had to provide a strong class-struggle perspective to provide a counter to the dominant feminist movement’s lack of liberatory potential. It also had to not only be inclusive to groups normally marginalized within the anarcha-feminist movement but also counter the prejudices they face. After some debate the federation reached a consensus of agreement to go forward and feelers were put out to other organisations.

Early on sibling federations throughout the IFA were keen to help, while here in Britain the SolFed joined and they made contact with their international federation the IWA. A meeting at 2013 London Anarchist Bookfair gathered support from independent anarcha-feminists, as did the creation of a web presence. After several months a consensus emerged on the criteria for organisation where those involved had to:

As planning went on things looked touch-and-go at times whether an event would be possible at all. New people got involved and others took breaks. Fundraising took place but money was short. Speakers and workshops started to came forward but then the programme had to be made to work. The inclusion policy was agreed along the lines of the form of oppression suffered which caused ripples in a field normally only looking purely to identity to give an indication of attendance. The safer spaces agreement was put in place and people needed to help on the day. Eventually everything started to come together.

Key to the whole event was the way in which different strands of the conference timetable would be given to groups usually marginalized within feminism (such as the disabled, sex workers, trans women, etc). This gave longer discussions over the course of the day about certain subjects, and it was hoped that this would highlight struggles from those who found their voices normally sidelined, vilified or lost entirely in feminist organising.

The day came and everything went past in a blur. Personally I spent the day either volunteering, supporting others, or helping to present the community accountability strand so I’m going to leave the nitty gritty of reviewing the strands to those who were there purely as attendees  This was the first time something like this had been attempted and it was all a bit experimental – but if we are ever to succeed in our goal of social revolution we have to be brave and try stuff. I think AFem did that and made a success of it all, though not everything was perfect.

I’ve also not kept up with the internet feedback but I know there has been moaning online. I find forums are a draining, negative space, and hearing that folks were griping (often folks who were not even in attendance), I haven’t gone to look for it yet – that can wait until I’m more rested. On the other hand I spent the days following AFem hopping between different people who had been in attendance. The feedback I’ve been getting in person has been overwhelmingly positive. One person said it was best anarcha feminist event they had attended (and they were not green in this kind of thing). All of them gave feedback of negative points, but it was fell into fairly similar areas, constructively phrased, and the positives were overwhelming to them. A quick rundown these:

+ Big open/close
Folks loved the opening and closing sessions which gathered everybody in attendance together and were kept on track by the organisers. The way people set goals for the day meant there was a collective feeling of active participation expected from folks attending.
+ Developing ideas
Everyone I talked to had learned new ideas and methods to take back home, and many otherwise liberal feminists were not only exposed to anarcha-feminism for the first time, but engaged and took away lessons from an anarchist perspective.
+ Strands
The way in which strands were organised was loved by all. It led for more discussion and time to work on things. People said this was SO MUCH BETTER than how bookfairs and other conferences run their meetings and it rarely felt like you were just being talked to but were part of a discussion.
+ Atmosphere
On the whole people found the atmosphere at the event to be positive and liberating, with people able to build solidarity against shared opression. ot only that but international links were forged and space for meeting other anarcha-feminists took place. They also commented on how easy it was to find organisers and volounteers, and upon how friendly and approachable they all were.
+ Safer Spaces Policy
Every person commented that it was refreshing to see is attempting a safer space policy that goes far beyond what most conferences would do, and think we have struck some new ground in how this could be put in place at similar events, though some areas do need development.
+ Self Care
Food Not Bombs provided lunch for anyone who was skint and was loved by all. At the same time a decent quiet space and the readily available interpretation and safer space volunteers made everything a lot more manageable.
+ Internationalism
The international aspect was seen as being vital to the experience, with at least 19 different countries represented in attendance, and something others would hope to see us expand.
+ Enthusiasm to continue
Overwhelmingly people wanted to see this happen again, if not next year then in 2016.

The constructive criticisms raised to me were:

– Time table clashes
These can almost never be avoided, and people acknowledged this, but at the same time everyone said there was some clash at some time for them. We tried the best we could but always worth keeping this in mind.
– TERF infestation
A group of trans exclusionary radical feminists (known as TERFs for short) tried to undermine the event. Someone who had been on the organiser list from the start lied about their willingness to uphold the inclusion policy to other organisers. They then positioned themselves to help present the Introduction to Anarcha-Feminism where they went off the presentation planned with the co-facilitator in order to spout some transphobic bile. At the same time they were seen conferring with other terfs before they dispersed into each session and parrot the same transphobic talking points, and appeared to be using the quiet space to regroup and plan. Attempts were made to remove the TERFs by some of the organisers but this unity was undermined and they used the confusion caused by sabotage of the consensus we had otherwise forged for the event to hang about. Despite this betrayal and sabotage, everyone I talked with found that any move towards transphobic discussion was quickly shut down and made unwelcome, and that the issue was handled better than most events. However, there was still a lack of consistency on how those breaking with the safer spaces agreement were dealt with.
– Cultural appropriation/racism
Lots of white people turned up using fashion displays from cultures that had been othered by white imperialism with no respect for the cultures they were came from and then got defensive when this was fed back in a negative light by the POC strand. Again, while the safer space policy had words on this subject we didn’t have a consistent process on what we were actually doing about it.
– Lack of resources
We didn’t have enough full programmes  for the attendees (though everyone did get a timetable), and while we had people on hand to read out the timetable we did not have large print versions. This was a major slip up and something that I will not be repeated.

On the TERF gang, it is unfortunate that but not surprising that they would go to such lengths to try and ruin the event. However if after a year of planning the best they could manage was to get one person to lie about their intentions and then protect the five or six die-hards that came along in the center of London then they have played what may be their hardest hitting attempt to disrupt at a time where the conference was vulnerable and gone home with plumbs. The problems that have been highlighted have came with constructive suggestions for improvement and the organising group are already moving forward with these, thought we are going to need to take a wee break before launching into any serious planning.

AFEM banner

AFem has now been fully realized as its own organisational entity,  separate to the groups that nurtured it early on. As a member of the AF this is a key example of the worth of the federation, and illustrates the way in which anarchist organisations differ from their authoritarian counterparts. Where others would use this as a front group and co-opt the struggles of others for self gain, anarchists work to create mutual aid and forge solidarity between truly autonomous groups, with struggles directed by those who are oppressed.  I have every confidence that this has been the start of an ongoing series of truly international events to build a modern anarcha-feminist practice and will start to ensure that anarcha-feminism is central to anything that could be regarded today as anarchist practice. As such, the last thing to say is a big thanks to everyone who contributed to making AFem 2014 a resounding success. Thank you all!

Events from the 18th August onwards

Hiya folks,

Highlights for me this week include: the meeting on Tuesday evening to see if there are people interested in forming a new social centre here in Glasgow; then on Wednesday the talk/discussion event in the Glasgow AF we are hosting about the very real ways capitalism effects our health for the worse and looking at ways to transform the world to be better suited for our well-being; and Fail Better raising funds for refugee Palestinians.

Anyway, without further ado…

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Create Your Own Cult, The Scientology Way – Dr Martin Poulter | Best of Glasgow Skeptics
Monday, August 18 at 7:00pm – 9:30pm
The Admiral Bar, 72a Waterloo Street, G2 7DA

Scientology has been described in the States as “ruthless, litigious and lucrative” and in this country as “corrupt, sinister and dangerous”, yet it boasts global success and has made hundreds of millions of dollars. Thanks to the Internet, it now faces an unprecedented global opposition. The scary secrets of Scientology and its recruitment methods will be exposed in this talk. It will be useful for anyone wanting to set up their own lucrative cult

Dr Martin Poulter first encountered skepticism while a teenager. He has a Philosophy and Psychology degree from Oxford University and a PhD in Philosophy of Science from the University of Bristol. He has been a Scientology-watcher since 1995, when he was threatened with legal action over material he posted online. He is an ordained minister in the Church of the SubGenius, which offers eternal spiritual salvation or triple your money back.

– – –

Martin spoke at one of Glasgow Skeptics’ first events, back in January 2010. As we approach our fifth birthday in November, we hope to bring back some of the best speakers we’ve heard from in that time.

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Reforming the Glasgow Social Centre Collective
Tuesday, August 19 at 7:00pm
Electron Club Room, CCA, 350 Sauchiehall St, G2 3JD

Glasgow Social Centre collective was a group that aimed to create a safe and healthy space, open to all members of the community, that was to operate as a hub for a variety of community and social groups in Glasgow. They worked on principles of mutual aid, solidarity and co-operation, and aimed to provide a space which promoted education and involvement in issues of environmental and social justice.

Due to changes in life circumstances the original collective had disbanded over a year ago, however some of it’s members are still at hand and the idea of opening a sustainable social centre lives on. Individuals and groups are invited to this open meeting to discuss the formation of a new GSC collective.

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A BIRD IS NOT A STONE: PALESTINIAN POETRY LIVE IN GLASGOW
Wednesday, August 20 at 8.00pm
Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, G1 5HB

Admission £5/£3

All Welcome!

Please join us for this rare opportunity to hear Palestinian poets reading their work in arabic with new versions performed by leading Scottish Poets.

Palestinian poets MAYA ABU AL-HAYYAT and ZUHEIR ABU SHAYEB will be joined by Liz Lochhead, Liz Niven, Christine De Luca, Abla Oudeh and Sarah Irving.

‘The tragic story of Palestine continues to stain this new century with its tales of apartheid and injustice. It is no surprise that great art is born out of its suffering and also no surprise that most people in the outer world do not get to hear of it. Therefore this exquisite book of poems must be all the more welcomed – by all those who love art, who would denounce oppression, and who want to read the songs of those living behind the wall.’ Emma Thompson, Oscar-winning actor

‘A Bird is Not a Stone is a fabulous, landmark collection, an example of poetry’s ability to transcend borders, cultures and languages in order to celebrate our shared humanity. These poems resound with both the ephemera of the everyday, and also the tragedies lived beneath an ever-present threat of violence. Not just beautiful, they are important for the voices they give sound to, and their translations by some of these Islands’ best poets are vital reminders of what we know, what we forget, and what we have to learn from Palestine.’ Carol Ann Duffy, British Poet Laureate

‘Angry, celebratory, bawdy and moving, these are poems by fine poets, translated by fine poets. They feel like the first offerings of the Cafavys, Nerudas and Lorcas of today, brought fresh to the modern reader.’ Andrew Marr, journalist and political commentator

‘This is a beautiful and timely expression of cultural solidarity and internationalism.’ Bella Caledonia

A rare opportunity to discover the range and variety of extraordinary voices in contemporary Palestinian poetry translated by Scotland’s most acclaimed poets.

A major collection of contemporary Palestinian poetry translated by 25 of Scotland’s very best writers including Alasdair Gray, Liz Lochhead, James Robertson, Jackie Kay, William Letford, Aonghas MacNeacail, DM Black, Tom Pow, Ron Butlin, Christine De Luca and John Glenday.

A Bird is Not a Stone is a unique cultural exchange, giving both English and Arabic readers a unique insight into the political, social and emotional landscape of today’s Palestine. Includes both established and emerging Palestinian poets.

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Penington Cohousing Public Meetings
Wednesday, August 20 at 05.15pm Cafe & 17.45 Blytheswood Room (Mitchell Library)
Sat 23 Aug 14.30 Cafe & 15.00 Blytheswood Room (Mitchell Library)

Seeking new members!

Cohousing is a way of living in community. Starting with an interested group of 20 to 25 households, we will design our homes for our site, including a common house where we will have regular shared meals and space for community activities, and visitor accommodation. The landscaping will enable more day to day interactions to develop the sense of belonging. Sharing the design process will be part of community formation. Once built we will each buy our homes, and pay a regular charge for the shared facilities, and do a few hours of work to maintain the facilities each week.

We plan to use high building standards, reducing the need for energy input, and generating electricity eg from solar cells. Design will take into account the anticipated needs of an ageing community, like step free access. Plans are to have a cross age community that is mutually supportive, with opportunities to engage in activities, and reducing the isolation currently prevalent among older people. We are looking for a site with good access to public transport as the Cohousing Community will be part of the wider community that it is located in, not a gated estate.

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Capitalism is a Health Hazard!
Wednesday, August 20 at 6:45pm – 9:00pm
Fred Paton Centre, 19 Carrington Street, G4 9AJ

Hierarchy harms our health. Inequality in income and lack of control over living and working conditions leads to deadly chronic stress. Climate and environmental destruction is a major threat to public health. And that’s before we get to consumerism and the isolation of the individual; the emptiness of modern existence.

While heathcare and modern sanitation are vital to achieve a base level of health, it will require a fundamental transformation of our society to tackle the big killers today and bring about well-being for all.

What would this healthy society look like?

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Glasgow AF discussion group is open and free to all, however any donations towards costs will be appreciated. Tea/coffee/juice/biscuits will be provided free of charge. Our venue is accessible to wheelchairs/powerchairs. We will also have a book stall from the RiB project with books and other related material for sale. We ask that all those attending this event read the brief introduction to our safer spaces policy here: https://glasgowanarchists.wordpress.com/safer-spaces/

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Fail Better: BOYCOTT ISRAEL
Thursday, August 21 at 8:00pm
McChuills, 40 High Street, G1 1NL

This Fail Better is dedicated to the martyrs of Palestine (Gaza, West Bank & Historic Palestine). By answering the call from the Palestinian civillian population for the total Boycott Divestment and Sanction of Israel, we can work to dismantle the Apartheid State.

There will be poetry, music & film including:

Short films made by the LAJEE youth centre in Aida Camp, Betlehem

If anyone has words or music to share, please get in touch.

This Fail Better is a social space for discussing where we are. There will be no formal discussion, but treat the night as place to meet up with friends and folk to discuss what’s going on – whatever your knowledge/involvement with the Palestinian struggle.

There will be as much information on BDS as we can get our hands on.

All pennies spent will go directly to help the refugees of Palestine

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NOT PROTEST, BUT ACTIVE RESISTANCE // LAVINIA RACCANELLO
Friday, August 22 – Sunday, September 7
New Glasgow Society, 1307 Argyle Street, G3 8TL.

“People have as much liberty as they have the intelligence to want and the courage to take.” – Emma Goldman

Lavinia Raccanello (1985) is an italian artist and activist, now based in Glasgow, where she was selected to be part of the Many Graduate programme 2013 – 2014. Her work always focusses on the relationship between human beings and society, with a particular emphasis on the power of dialectic and participatory practice. At the beginning of March, she moved to Faslane Peace Camp, the longest-running permanent peace camp in the world, and for her first solo exhibition at New Glasgow Society she stands up with Faslane Peace Campers for a nuclear-free Scotland.

On the closing day of the exhibition, September 7th, an open talk will be hosted in the gallery space, inviting artists, politicians, activists, and concerned citizens to come together to share their views on nuclear weapons along with their hopes for the future.

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The Decline of Violence – Helen Dale | Glasgow Skeptics
Monday, August 25 at 7:00pm – 9:30pm
The Admiral Bar, 72a Waterloo Street, G2 7DA

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, criminologists warned a despairing and frightened public throughout the developed world that already terrifying rates of violent crime would continue to rise. They described, among other things, the emergence of the ‘Superpredator’, an adolescent male who knew neither conscience nor remorse.

However, their predictions were wrong.

Crime rates began to drop like a stone. In the US, the drop had already commenced when criminologists were sounding their direst warnings. Other developed countries – including both England and Scotland – followed the US lead, and crime is now at historic lows.

Those who have read Steven Pinker’s ‘The Better Angels of Our Nature’ would be aware that Western societies have become less violent over the long term – as in, since the Middle Ages. The period from 1965 to 1990 – when crime rose – represented a short-lived and partial reversal of this trend. Because criminologists got it so wrong, many have reoriented their scholarship in an attempt to work out just what it was that made crime escalate in the 1960s, and then, as though by magic, drop away in the 1990s.
Helen will discuss the various theories put forward in an attempt to explain the latest decline of violence, and offer suggestions as to which have the greatest explanatory power.

Helen Dale studied her English law at Oxford (where she was at Brasenose) and her Scots law at Edinburgh, and although she now works in corporate law, she started out – for the most part – practising criminal law. One of her advanced papers at Oxford was in criminology, and she (like lots of other lawyers) wanted to work out how an entire discipline could get it so wrong, and what may explain the (recent) decline of violence.

Helen blogs at: http://skepticlawyer.com.au/

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Education as the Practice of Freedom
Wednesday, September 17 at 6:45pm – 9:00pm
Fred Paton Centre, 19 Carrington Street, G4 9AJ

“There is no such thing as a neutral educational process. Education either functions as an instrument that is used to facilitate the integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity to it, or it becomes “the practice of freedom,” the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world.” – Paulo Freire

Anarchists have a long and illustrious history of involvement within education, with interventions in libertarian education as notable as Ferrer’s Escuela Moderna, and the Free Skools, right through into the contemporary spaces of Social Centres. As a movement, Anarchism has historically emphasised the importance of the role of education – whether as a domesticating tool of oppression or as a prefiguring and liberating force – with a concern rarely echoed in other political perspectives.

While naturally touching on some of that history, this talk will mainly be concerned with the understanding that radicalism presents us with a fundamentally educational space, and will consider this in light of the work of Paulo Freire, among others. Though identifying outside of the specific Anarchist tradition, Freire’s work within Popular Education can be easily understood as broadly libertarian, and with implications and prospects for Anarchism.

Though the talk will highlight the role of informal education, contributions and reflections on all modes are welcome and expected in the discussion following.

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Glasgow AF discussion group is open and free to all, however any donations towards costs will be appreciated. Tea/coffee/juice/biscuits will be provided free of charge. Our venue is accessible to wheelchairs/powerchairs. We will also have a book stall from the RiB project with books and other related material for sale. We ask that all those attending this event read the brief introduction to our safer spaces policy here: https://glasgowanarchists.wordpress.com/safer-spaces/

Liberal feminism is also the enemy

The Guardian today published a piece entitled “If we get bogged down in the TERF war we’ll never achieve anything“. This piece of writing is cissexist in its own right, so keep that in mind before clicking through. Also if you are unsure on what a TERF is then I highly recommend reading this.

Anyway, taking the main thrust of the piece at face value it seems that it would be very easy for mainstream feminism to end the TERF war within its ranks. Kick the TERFs out. Refuse to share platforms with them. Strongly assert support for trans women as women and welcome them into their organisations. That’s what anarcha-feminists have largely been doing all along.

The only reason for keeping the TERF’s about is to keep them at war with trans women. This protects the relatively rich, usually white, feminist’s aspirations of becoming an accepted part of the ruling class while keeping working class women down. Never be fooled: Liberal feminism is just as much the enemy as the TERF.

ASIDE: There is still time to donate to AFEM2014, an upcoming anarcha-feminist conference taking place this October, full details here: https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/2mmvd/sh/23Rrn4

Reforming the Glasgow Social Centre Collective

Tuesday 19th August
19:00 – 21:00
Electron Club Room, CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, G2 3JD.

Facebook | Map

Glasgow Social Centre collective was a group that aimed to create a safe and healthy space, open to all members of the community, that was to operate as a hub for a variety of community and social groups in Glasgow. They worked on principles of mutual aid, solidarity and co-operation, and aimed to provide a space which promoted education and involvement in issues of environmental and social justice.

Due to changes in life circumstances the original collective had disbanded over a year ago, however some of it’s members are still at hand and the idea of opening a sustainable social centre lives on. Individuals and groups are invited to this open meeting to discuss the formation of a new GSC collective.

A provisional agenda has been posted on their facebook page.

Capitalism is a Health Hazard! (talk/discussion)

Wednesday 20th August
18:45 – 21:00
Fred Paton Centre, 19 Carrington Street, Glasgow, G4 9AJ.
Facebook | Map

Hierarchy harms our health. Inequality in income and lack of control over living and working conditions leads to deadly chronic stress. Climate and environmental destruction is a major threat to public health. And that’s before we get to consumerism and the isolation of the individual; the emptiness of modern existence.

While heathcare and modern sanitation are vital to achieve a base level of health, it will require a fundamental transformation of our society to tackle the big killers today and bring about well-being for all.

What would this healthy society look like?

Glasgow AF discussion group is open and free to all, however any donations towards costs will be appreciated. Tea/coffee/juice/biscuits will be provided free of charge. Our venue is accessible to wheelchairs/powerchairs. We will also have a book stall from the RiB project with books and other related material for sale. We ask that all those attending this event read the brief introduction to our safer spaces policy here.